Wednesday, 4 February 2009

BBC values: slags and slappers protected, saying "golliwog" condemned

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article5651477.ece

So, Carol Thatcher calling a tennis player a "golliwog" is more offensive than Russell Brand and Jonathan Ross leaving obscene messages on the answering machine of Andrew Sachs to the effect that Russell Brand has had carnal knowledge of his granddaughter, Georgina Bailie.

Why didn't Ross and Brand just leave an obscene message on the answering machine of Georgina Bailie, the Satanic Slut and burlesque dancer? This may be due to the operating fear that the feminists in charge at the BBC would have their balls for breakfast.

And so they picked on her grandfather.

So, in British society, it is considered more socially-acceptable to leave obscene messages for a grandfather of a slag and slapper than it is to call a slag and slapper a slag and slapper?

And calling someone "golliwog" is worse than either of the above?

These are the values the BBC are now propagating.

There is no need to ask yourself if the world has gone mad. It went mad as long ago as 1972, when the first of the series of thought-crime anti-discrimination Acts were passed. The chickens have now come home to roost.

7 comments:

Robert Brown said...

I agree, the world has gone mad, and I agree with your date as far as this country is concerned - 1972.

George Eldon said...

The slang terms are associated with different 'prejudices'; racism and sexism. Probably not as simple as that but bear with me. At the core, the question I believe you are asking is: "Is sexism deemed more acceptable than racism?" Well of course it is and rightly so in my opinion.

That doesn't stop me also believing that there is a politically correct risk averse intellectually corrupt sector in society that is weakening and set on weakening society. Generally if these people were to lose their job, it would bring to mind the question "If a tree fell on a mime in a forest would anyone notice?".

Andromeda said...

Thank you for commenting, George Eldon! We should also ask ourselves if we are indeed freer than other societies, such as China, Russia and an assortment of tinpot dictatorships, when we talk about the so-called freedoms we enjoy in the West!

Jeff Marshall said...

We should not lose sight of the fact that the BBC is (or should be) accountable to licence payers.

It is not simply a matter of ´sexism`vs ´racism´ but of gross, indecent behaviour conducted on air compared to a harmless joke made virtually in private & off air in the BBC green room.

The BBC has told us exactly how it feels these two offences should be punished. Do we agree? If we do not agree, ought we not to complain?

In fact, the BBC fears another controversy because it desires to maintain the licensing arrangements.

Those who disagree with the BBC licence - as well as its ´diversity´ agenda - ought to inform the BBC exactly how they feel about Carol Thatcher´s sacking.

Scorpio said...

Robert Brown is absolutely right. As a child growing up in the late 50's and 60's, a golliwog was, and for me still is, a child's doll, very colourful; nothing more. I never remotely considered it as associated with a person (black man) UNTIL for some reason they started referring to the "doll" as a "golly" and then of course we have the legislation referred to.

When will people "left-liberal" types realise that you can never effectively legislate against people's prejudices real or imagined and any attempt to do so only brings into focus the issue you wish to resolve and makes it more likely to alienate other people by denying the much more important right to freedom of speech.

If Carol Thatcher thinks someone is a golliwog, so what, no doubt golliwogs have their own opinions on her.

Jeff Marshall said...

As a child, I didn´t know the golly was meant to be a darkie either.

Surely though it was the suffix,
-wog, rather than the prefix, golly-, which gave the game away.

wildgoose said...

It's probably worth pointing out that apparently the "Golliwog" tennis player was that Anglophobic Scot Andy Murray.

This of course will be the reason why the tennis player's identity wasn't revealed - in order to deliberately imply that Carrol Thatcher was referring to a black player.